I Swoon for Icewine (Tea)

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Icewine – or eiswein – is an interesting German peculiarity that appeared on the scene some three hundred years ago. Simply put, white wine grapes were plucked in the middle of winter while the juices inside were still frozen. The sugars within were more concentrated as a result. Creating a batch was a labor-intensive process that wasn’t streamlined until the 1960s. Twenty years later, vineyards in Canada collectively said, “Hey, we’re cold as S**T up here. We can totally make this stuff!” And so they did.

Two years ago, the existence of icewine came to my attention by – of all things – a tea blend I happened by in my usual searches for orthodox beverages. What really impressed me was that it was a white tea/grape fusion; I could think of no more magical a combination. But I was lifted from my reverie with a geeky pang – an urge to look up (and eventually try) actual icewine. I’d never heard of such a libation before.

Two weeks ago, an opportunity to try the dessert wine presented itself at – of all things – a Rapture party. From the first sip on, I was hooked. It tasted like mead only sweeter and more nectar-y. Before I knew it, I’d downed the 16(-ish?)oz. bottle. Solo. Even the one glass that the bottle’s owner didn’t finish. Habit-forming? Understatement.

Unfortunately, having icewine everyday didn’t seem like a healthy prospect in the long run – either for my wallet or my liver. As luck would have it, though, a teashop owner in Ontario – dubbed All Things Tea – presented me with an interesting alternative. An icewine white tea blend. My odd little journey had come full circle.

According to All Things Tea, the ingredients for their white blend were Bai Mu Dan (White Peony), Ontario Icewine, and a touch of Reisling. This differed from other icewine/white blends I read about in that there were no grapes, botanicals or flavoring agents included. I was actually relieved to hear that. While White Peony had a lot of flavor to it, when blended, a subtler scenting process was more complimentary. And by whiff alone, I could tell a devil’s deal was struck.

I can’t say that I smelled much of a white tea presence to this batch, but it certainly lived up to its moniker. It boasted its white wine fragrance loudly and proudly. Notes of sour grape, honey, and a mid-point sweetness clobbered my nostrils as I put nose to bag. Given my experience with actual icewine, I had hoped for exactly that type of bluntness with the blend.

Brewing instructions on the bag recommended 1 heaping teaspoon per 6oz. cup of steaming water and a two-minute wait. I tended to aim for an 8oz. cup o’ tea, so I measured off 1 tablespoon instead and went with a 165F water temperature. After splashdown, I steeped the leaves for a good two-and-a-half minutes. It was White Peony; it could take it.

The liquor brewed to an uncanny deep gold. It looked exactly like white wine, save for a slightly lighter palette. The aroma was both sweet and sour, reminding me a bit of lychee. However, the citrus tone was backed up by a smooth texture that completed the wine-like comparison. Some of the natural grape-iness of the White Peony also made its presence known in the finish.

I found this blend’s true calling when I dabbled with ice and a pint glass. After brewing a concentrate of 2 tbsn. of Peony in 8oz. of hot water, I filled a tall glass with ice, then poured the contents over it and stirred. The lovely gold from the heated brew didn’t dissipate one bit – if anything, it shimmered more. On the lips, it truly reminded me of icewine thanks to a honey-ish lean I hadn’t detected in the hot tea version. After a couple of savored sips, I tested out a dash of stevia. No surprise, it sweetened well, too. This is the perfect iced white for summer. What a shock. All the wine taste with none of the headache.

6 Comments

  1. Profile photo of jackie jackie says:

    Fascinating! I’ve had ice wine before, but had forgotten how it’s made. Thanks for reminding me. For me, it’s too sweet to drink but I can imagine a lot of people would happily guzzle down the stuff.

    As to ice wine tea, I’ve only tried this based on a black tea. I think it was a Ceylon. I thought it was drinkable but I wouldn’t order it again, since there are so many other teas out there that I either like more, or want to try.

    Interesting reading about your Bai Mu Dan tea blend. I can imagine it would make for a good iced ice tea!

    Great pics too,
    J.

    1. I saw a Ceylon/icewine blend around the “interwebz”, too. I also saw a a white tea/Ceylon/icewine/grape blend, which made no sense. Sometimes with blending, it’s best to keep it relatively simple. This had just the right kiss of wine flavor to work. I fell for actual icewine because I’m privy to sweeter whites…and sweeter white teas. *hehe* So, this worked for me.

      The second and last pic were provided by the teashop owner. Really nice gal.

      Thanks for commenting. :-)

  2. Profile photo of xavier xavier says:

    Wine and tea?
    What a strange mix!

    1. It sounds strange on first hearing of it, but when you mull over it (maybe over mulled wine *heh*) it actually is a poetic combination.

      1. Profile photo of xavier xavier says:

        Except that I don’t like wine :D

        1. Well…there’s always beer tea. @52teas has one. *heh*

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